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CALLS FOR ENTRIES

METROPOLIS | URBAN LANDSCAPES
Intake: February 6 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: February 27 | Closing: March 19
Download full call for entries | Download exhibition contract

In the visual arts, urban landscape is an artistic representation, such as a painting, drawing, print, or photograph, of the physical aspects of a city or urban area. In urban design, the term refers to the configuration of built forms and interstitial space.

From the first century A.D. dates a fresco at the Baths of Trajan in Rome depicting a bird's eye view of an ancient city. In the Middle Ages, urban landscapes appeared as backgrounds for portraits and biblical themes. From the 16th through 18th centuries numerous copperplate prints and etchings were made showing cities from above, to function as map-like overviews. Halfway through the 17th century the cityscape became an independent genre.

At the end of the 19th century the impressionists focused on the atmosphere and dynamics of everyday life in the city. Suburban and industrial areas, building sites and railway yards also became subjects for cityscapes. During the 20th century attention became focused on abstract and conceptual art, and thus the production of urban landscapes declined.

Contemporary urban landscapes can include abstract and conceptual art, digital photography, and more. Pieces created should capture the atmosphere and dynamics of everyday life in or around an urban setting as well as reflect the themes of urban landscapes, such as how we relate to the places we live and their impact on our sense of space and place. Additional research is encouraged. All media will be accepted.

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ARCADIA | PASTORAL LANDSCAPES
Intake: February 6 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: February 27 | Closing: March 19
Download full call for entries | Download exhibition contract

A pastoral lifestyle is that of shepherds herding livestock around open areas of land according to seasons and the changing availability of water and pasture. It lends its name to a genre of literature, art, and music that depicts such life in an idealized manner, typically for urban audiences.

Pastoral landscapes are beautiful rural landscapes, the literary term for which is "locus amoenus" (Latin for "beautiful place"). Pastoral is a mode in which the artist employs various techniques to place the complex life into a simple one.

Pastoral landscapes celebrate the dominion of mankind over nature. The scenes are peaceful, often depicting ripe harvests, lovely gardens, manicured lawns with broad vistas, and fattened livestock. Humans have developed and tamed the landscape - it yields the necessities of life, as well as beauty and safety.

Pieces should be created to reflect these themes and should evoke feelings of beauty and peace to the viewer. Additional research is encouraged. All media will be accepted.

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MADONNA AND CHILD | INTERPRETATIONS
Intake: March 5 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: March 26 | Closing: April 23
Download full call for entries | Download exhibition contract

Motherhood and/or caregiving is a profound aspect of the human experience and Madonna and Child works appear in many global religions, cultures, and styles including Roman Catholicism, Queen Ankhnes-meryre II and her son, Pepy II from Egypt, and Guanyin and Child (an East Asian deity of mercy, and a bodhisattva). Artworks of the Christ Child and his mother Mary are far-reaching and iconic. Often in these depictions, Mary appears much larger than other participants, symbolic of her exalted status.

Contemporary Madonna and Child works need not be traditional representations of Mary and Jesus, but can be abstracted to the point of minimalism. Traditionally paintings, altars, and sculpture depict the Madonna and Child, but experimentation and non-traditional media are encouraged. Pieces should include a larger mother figure (the Madonna) and a smaller child like figure (the Child) and do not require a religious context. Additional research on the Madonna and Child concept is highly recommended. All media will be accepted.

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COSMOS
Intake: March 5 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: March 26 | Closing: April 23
Download full call for entries | Download exhibition contract

The Universe is all of time and space and its contents. The Universe includes planets, stars, galaxies, the contents of intergalactic space, the smallest subatomic particles, and all matter and energy. The observable universe is about 28 billion parsecs (91 billion light-years) in diameter at the present time, though the size of the whole Universe is not known and may be infinite.

The region of space within our Solar System is called interplanetary space, also known as interplanetary medium. The Solar System comprises the Sun and the planetary system that orbits it, either directly or indirectly. Of those objects that orbit the Sun directly, the largest eight are the planets, with the remainder being significantly smaller objects, such as dwarf planets and small Solar System bodies such as comets and asteroids.

Human beings have been captivated and inspired by the night sky since the beginning of recorded history. From the ancient Egyptians to the Mayans to the Greeks, we have always been fascinated by what else is or may be out there. Nearly every kind of mythology has a relationship with outer space and many constellations and stars have names derived from ancient Greek mythology. Art created during these periods reflected this tie as well.

Pieces created should celebrate the vast beauty or danger of outer space and can include but are not limited to planets, stars, star systems, galaxies, solar systems, mythology and culture references to outer space, and interpretations of advancement in space travel and the future of outer space exploration. Any science fiction must be based in currently accepted scientific fact. Additional research is encouraged. All media will be accepted.

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MINOR THREAT | UNDER 18
Intake: April 2 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: April 30 | Closing: May 21
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The classic comment "My kid could make that." may have truth in response to certain artworks, but truer yet - Could an adult be tasked with the kind of free and unfettered creative expression that seems to come so naturally to the young? Aesthetic appreciation of children's art as untainted by adult influence was extolled by Franz Cižek, an Austrian painter and teacher, who called a child's drawing "a marvelous and precious document". Discovery of the aesthetic quality of the unskilled visual expression by children was related to the aesthetics of modernism and, in case of Cižek, to the Vienna Secession in 1897.

As valued as young people are in cultures and societies around the globe, they are often overlooked both as legitimate viewers and creators of art. Studies conducted on the topic have reported a dissonance between the culture of art museums and the culture and identity of young people, who "do not feel as if they are a part" of these institutions, even sometimes experiencing what's known as "threshold fear;" a kind of psychological barrier which dissuades people from entering spaces where they feel uncomfortable. This is evident in many young people's perceptions of their own role as creators, and unlikeliness to submit their work to non child-specific shows.

The art of young people need no longer be relegated to available space on the refrigerator, instead finding recognition and validation in the galleries of today's art world. Though each of Cottonwood's 2016 exhibitions is open to artists in this age group, Minor Threat is a declaration of support and celebration for the next generation of creative thinkers, dreamers, and doers we see sharing the goal of fostering arts, culture, and beauty in Colorado Springs.

Work can be inspired by your own experiences, thoughts or feelings you're compelled to express, the world around you and current events, or simply pieces created for the sake of creating. No unifying theme will be enforced for this show, and all artists whose 18th birthday falls on or after May 1st, 2016 are invited to submit work. Additional research is encouraged. All media accepted.

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A SIMPLER TIME | NOSTALGIA
Intake: April 2 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: April 30 | Closing: May 21
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Nostalgia is a sentimentality for the past, typically for a period or place with happy personal associations. The word nostalgia is a learned formation of a Greek compound, consisting of nóstos, meaning "homecoming", and a Homeric word, álgos, meaning "pain, ache." Nostalgia can refer to a general interest in the past, personalities and events, and the "good old days.”

Nostalgia is triggered by something reminding an individual of an event or item from their past, conjuring emotions that vary from happiness to sorrow. The term "feeling nostalgic" is more commonly used to describe pleasurable emotions associated with and/or a longing to go back to a particular period of time.

Pieces created should invoke a sense of happiness or longing and should be family friendly in nature as this show will hang with Minor Threat. Nostalgic pieces can also include nostalgic materials. Additional research is encouraged. All media will be accepted.

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TEXT_MESSAGE | TEXT ART
Intake: May 7 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: May 28 | Closing: June 18
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Language and text were important tools for the Conceptual artists of the 1960s, many of whom used text in place of more expected subjects, giving words a primary role in their emphasis on ideas over visual forms. Though text had been used in art long before this, artists like Joseph Kosuth were among the first to give words such a central role. The appearance of the words plays a role in text art, but it is the artist themselves who ultimately decides whether aesthetic or message is the primary focus.

Pieces created can feature text as the main element or can include text in a way that contributes to the overall aesthetic or statement. Text can be represented in traditional or unexpected media, make up the dominant or only element of a work, come from deconstructed books, have reference to technology and communication, offer insight into the various forms of language, be used in collage or assemblage, or come from created books and art journals. Anything with text as an element will be considered. Additional research about text and language in art is encouraged. All media will be accepted.

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SCREAMS AND WHISPERS | EXPRESSIONISM
Intake: May 7 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: May 28 | Closing: June 18
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Expressionism was a modernist movement, initially in poetry and painting, originating in Germany at the beginning of the 20th century. Its typical trait is to present the world solely from a subjective perspective, distorting it radically for emotional effect in order to evoke moods or ideas. Expressionist artists sought to express the meaning of emotional experience rather than physical reality.

Developed as an avant-garde style before the First World War, expressionism extends to a wide range of the arts, including architecture, painting, literature, theatre, dance, film, and music. The Expressionist emphasis on individual perspective has been characterized as a reaction to positivism and other artistic styles such as Naturalism and Impressionism. Though at times suggestive of angst, quiet expression of one’s mood, thoughts, or feelings is a theme also found throughout the movement.

Pieces created should invoke an emotional response and create a dialogue about moods and ideas, taking viewers out of their physical reality. Additional research is encouraged. All media will be accepted.

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MAKE IT SO | FAN ART SHOW + COSPLAY EVENT
Intake: June 4 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: June 25 | Closing: July 23
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Fan art or fanart are artworks created by fans of a work of fiction (generally visual media such as comics, movies, television shows, or video games) and derived from a character or other aspect of that work. As fan labor, fan art refers to artworks that are neither created nor (normally) commissioned or endorsed by the creators of the work from which the fan art derives.

Fan art can take many forms. In addition to traditional paintings and drawings, fan artists may also create web banners, avatars, or web-based animations, as well as photo collages, posters, and artistic representations of quotes from a work. The broad availability of digital image processing and the Internet has greatly increased the scope and potential reach of fan art.

Pieces created should be fan art from movies, books, television shows, video games, and other popular culture. All media will be accepted.

Cosplay, a portmanteau of the words costume play, is a performance art in which participants called cosplayers wear costumes and fashion accessories to represent a specific character. Cosplayers often interact to create a subculture and a broader use of the term "cosplay" applies to any costumed role-playing in venues apart from the stage. Any entity that lends itself to dramatic interpretation may be taken up as a subject and it is not unusual to see genders switched. Favorite sources include manga and anime, comic books and cartoons, video games, and live-action films and television series.

Make It So will be more than just an art show. For opening night we encourage any and all cosplay artists to attend in costume to add an additional dynamic to the experience of fan art, and the evening will include a People’s Choice award for Best Costume.

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BRAVE NEW WORLD | NEW MEDIA
Intake: June 4 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: June 25 | Closing: July 23
Download full call for entries

New Media Art is a genre that encompasses artworks created with new media technologies, including digital art, computer graphics, computer animation, virtual art, Internet art, interactive art, video games, computer robotics, 3D printing, and art as biotechnology. The term differentiates itself by its resulting cultural objects and social events, which can be seen in opposition to those deriving from old visual arts (i.e. traditional painting, sculpture, etc.). New Media Art often involves interaction between artist and observer or between observers and the artwork, which responds to them. Such forms of interaction, social exchange, participation, and transformation do not distinguish New Media Art but rather serve as a common ground that has parallels in other strands of contemporary art practice. Such insights emphasize the forms of cultural practice that arise concurrently with emerging technological platforms and question the focus on technological media.

New Media concepts are often derived from the telecommunications, mass media and digital electronic modes of delivering the artworks involved, with practices ranging from conceptual to virtual art, performance to installation.

Non-linearity can be seen as an important topic to New Media Art by artists developing interactive, generative, collaborative, immersive artworks where the content relies on the user's experience. This is a key concept since people acquired the notion that they were conditioned to view everything in a linear and clear-cut fashion. Now, art is stepping out of that form and allowing for people to build their own experiences with the piece. Non-linearity describes a project that escapes from the conventional linear narrative coming from novels, theater plays and movies. Non-linear art usually requires audience participation or at least, the fact that the "visitor" is taken into consideration by the representation, altering the displayed content. Art is not produced as a completed object submitted to the audience appreciation, it is a process in permanent mutation.

The emergence of 3D printing has introduced a new bridge to New Media Art, joining the virtual and physical worlds. The rise of this technology has allowed artists to blend the computational base of New Media Art with the traditional physical form of sculpture.

Pieces created must be new media and can include but are not limited to digital art, computer graphics, computer animation, virtual art, Internet art, interactive art, video games, computer robotics, 3D printing as sculpture, and art as biotechnology. Additional research is encouraged.

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WAR IS NOT HEALTHY FOR CHILDREN AND OTHER LIVING THINGS
Intake: July 2 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: July 30 | Closing: August 20
Download full call for entries

War is a state of armed conflict between societies. It is generally characterized by extreme collective aggression, destruction, and usually high mortality.

Nations customarily measure the 'costs of war' in dollars, lost production, or the number of soldiers killed or wounded. Rarely do military establishments attempt to measure the costs of war in terms of individual human suffering. Psychiatric breakdown remains one of the most costly items of war when expressed in human terms.

Military personnel subject to combat in war often suffer mental and physical injuries, including depression, post traumatic stress disorder, disease, injury, and death. In every war in which American soldiers have fought in, the chances of becoming a psychiatric casualty - of being debilitated for some period of time as a consequence of the stresses of military life - were greater than the chances of being killed by enemy fire.

Most wars have resulted in significant loss of life, along with destruction of infrastructure and resources (which may lead to famine, disease, death in the civilian population, a decrease in social spending, large-scale emigration from the war zone, and often the mistreatment of prisoners of war or civilians). Civilians in war zones may also be subject to war atrocities such as genocide, while survivors may suffer the psychological aftereffects of witnessing the destruction of war.

Typically speaking, war becomes very intertwined with the economy and many wars are partially or entirely based on economic reasons. Some economists believe war can stimulate a country's economy but in many cases warfare serves only to damage the economy of the countries involved.

War leads to forced migration causing potentially large displacements of population. Among forced migrants there are usually relatively large shares of artists and other types of creative people causing the war effects to be particularly harmful for the country’s creative potential in the long-run. War is further argued to have a direct impact on artistic output, as it disrupts the production processes and distribution of artworks. Since creativity in the arts is often an expression of intense feeling, and as war affects the frame of mind of an artist, it has a negative effect on an artist’s individual life-cycle output.

War is not healthy for children and other living things
Another Mother for Peace (AMP) is a grassroots anti-war advocacy group founded in 1967 in opposition to the U.S. war in Vietnam. AMP’s first action was a Mother's Day campaign in opposition to the Vietnam War. Their plan was to send then-President Lyndon B. Johnson and members of Congress Mother's Day cards expressing their yearning for peace. Los Angeles artist Lorraine Art Schneider donated the use of a striking illustration for the Mother's Day peace cards - a sunflower on yellow background amid the slogan “War is not healthy for children and other living things.”

Pieces should be created to reflect these themes, specifically the effects of war. Additional research is encouraged. All media will be accepted.

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THE FLORAL SHOW
Intake: July 2 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: July 30 | Closing: August 20
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With the widespread importance of flowers throughout the history of human cultures, it is understandable that all forms of art have involved flowers on some level: sculpture, books, music, interior design, painting, ceramics, decorative tiles, and so forth. Floral works generally symbolize the romantic notion that the delights of this world are transitory and perishable.

During the Medieval and Early Renaissance Ages from the 13th to the 15th century, flower symbolism and plant symbolism developed as a way of teaching religious truths. For example, the ivy is an evergreen and symbolized eternal life. A peach symbolized truth and salvation and was used in place of the maligned apple.

The symbolism of flowers has evolved since early Christian days. The most common flowers and their symbolic meanings include: rose (Virgin Mary, transience, Venus, love); lily (Virgin Mary, virginity, female breast, purity of mind or justice); tulip (showiness, nobility); sunflower (faithfulness, divine love, devotion); violet (modesty, reserve, humility); columbine (melancholy); poppy (power, sleep, death). In addition, some flowers are associated with particular artists. Monet is famous for his water lilies, Georgia O’Keeffe is best known for her sensuous calla lilies, and Vincent Van Gogh is associated with his portraits of sunflowers.

This topic encourages artists to explore the beauty, peace, transition, and impermanence associated with floral works. Pieces must be created to represent florals in some way. Additional research is encouraged. All media will be accepted.

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AN EXAMINED LIFE | SELF PORTRAITS
Intake: August 6 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: August 27 | Closing: September 17
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 A self-portrait is a representation of an artist, drawn, painted, photographed, or sculpted by that artist. Although self-portraits have been made by artists since the earliest times, it is not until the Early Renaissance in the mid-15th century that artists can be frequently identified depicting themselves as either the main subject, or as important characters in their work. With better and cheaper mirrors, and the advent of the panel portrait, many painters, sculptors and printmakers tried some form of self-portraiture. The genre is venerable, but not until the Renaissance, with increased wealth and interest in the individual as a subject, did it become truly popular.

Historically portraits were commissioned by the very wealthy and were not as accessible to people of common means. Self portraits allowed artists the freedom to present their own likeness with no need for outside perspective. Portraits and self portraits can both be viewed as historical documents, while only the latter offer the viewer a personal relationship with the artist’s interpretation of themselves, whether the depiction is based in truth, or simply the truth they wish to present.

With the advent of modern photographic technology and greater availability to the masses, along with the widespread acceptance of contemporary artistic movements and non-traditional mediums, the self portrait has evolved into an expression of almost limitless possibility.

A true self portrait requires a certain level of introspection, sets out to tell a story about the individual, and should be developed beyond the instant nature of the everyday smartphone-facilitated selfie. A self portrait can be skewed, abstracted, or distorted and does not need to be a literal representation of the self. Additional research is encouraged. All media will be accepted.

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ALL THINGS MUST PASS | STILL LIFE
Intake: August 6 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: August 27 | Closing: September 17
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A work of art has beauty and value when the elements of the composition achieve a harmonic unity through the actions of the artist. The struggle of the artist to always go further in this pursuit enriches the work with a spiritual value. Still life allows the artist the most opportunity to stay focused on the infinite possibilities of color and composition to be discovered.

Historically a still life painting or photograph is the study of inanimate objects. These objects are typically those of the everyday and include plants, fruit, vegetables, dishes, soup cans and more. But, perhaps even more importantly, a key feature of still life artwork is the degree of control that the artist can exercise over the work. The elements that make up a still life can be arranged or composed by the artist at will; the lighting can be redirected. Still life painting can be seen to be a relatively pure, even abstract, form of art.

In the wake of the computer age, and the rise of Computer art and Digital art the nature and definition of still life has changed. Contemporary still life breaks the two-dimensional barrier and employs three-dimensional mixed media, and uses found objects, photography, computer graphics, video and sound, and even spilling out from ceiling to floor, and filling an entire room in a gallery.

Pieces created should invoke harmonic unity through composition and choice of subject matter. Additional research is encouraged. All media will be accepted.

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ELEMENTAL | ELEMENTS OF ART
Intake: September 3 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: September 24 | Closing: October 22
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The elements of art are the building blocks used by artists to create a work of art. The elements of art are line, shape, form, space, color, and texture.

Line: Line is a mark with greater length than width. Lines can be horizontal, vertical, or diagonal; straight or curved; thick or thin.

Shape: Shape is a closed line. Shapes can be geometric, like squares and circles; or organic, like free-form or natural shapes. Shapes are flat and can express length and width.

Form: Forms are three-dimensional shapes expressing length, width, and depth. Balls, cylinders, boxes, and pyramids are forms.

Space: Space is the area between and around objects. The space around objects is often called negative space; negative space has shape. Space can also refer to the feeling of depth. Real space is three-dimensional; in visual art, when we create the feeling or illusion of depth, we call it space.

Color: Color is light reflected off of objects. Color has three main characteristics: hue (the name of the color, such as red, green, blue, etc.), value (how light or dark it is), and intensity (how bright or dull it is).

White is pure light; black is the absence of light.

Primary colors are the only true colors (red, blue, and yellow). All other colors are mixes of primary colors. Secondary colors are two primary colors mixed together (green, orange, violet). Intermediate colors, sometimes called tertiary colors, are made by mixing a primary and secondary color together. Some examples of intermediate colors are yellow green, blue green, and blue violet.

Complementary colors are located directly across from each other on the color wheel (an arrangement of colors along a circular diagram to show how they are related to one another). Complementary pairs contrast because they share no common colors. For example, red and green are complements, because green is made of blue and yellow. When complementary colors are mixed together, they neutralize each other to make brown.

Texture: Texture is the surface quality that can be seen and felt. Textures can be rough or smooth, soft or hard. Textures do not

always feel the way they look; for example, a drawing of a porcupine may look prickly, but if you touch the drawing, the paper is still smooth.

Choose your favorite element (or elements) to inform your work, or choose an element (or elements) that you usually don’t use and challenge yourself. No conceptual theme will be enforced for this show. All media will be accepted.

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SUI GENERIS | AVANT-GARDE
Intake: September 3 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: September 24 | Closing: October 22
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A book, movie, television series, or other artistic creation is said to be sui generis when it does not fit into standard genre boundaries. Avant-garde (from French, "advance guard" or "vanguard", literally "fore-guard") are works that are experimental or innovative. The concept of avant-garde refers primarily to artists, writers, composers, and thinkers whose work is opposed to mainstream cultural values and often has a trenchant social or political edge. Avant-garde pushes the boundaries of what is accepted as the norm or the status quo, primarily in the cultural realm. Avant-garde is considered by some to be a hallmark of modernism, as distinct from postmodernism.

Avant-garde includes but is not limited to anti-art, experimental art, and outsider art. Pieces created do not need to fit specific genre boundaries and should be experimental or evocative in some way, pushing the perceptions of art and the status quo. Additional research is encouraged. All media will be accepted.

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STEAM
Intake: October 1 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: October 29 | Closing: November 19
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In this climate of economic uncertainty, America is once again turning to innovation as the way to ensure a prosperous future. Yet innovation remains tightly coupled with Science, Technology, Engineering and Math - the STEM subjects. Art and Design are poised to transform our economy in the 21st century just as science and technology did in the last century. STEAM is a movement championed by Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) and widely adopted by institutions, corporations, and individuals.

The objectives of the STEAM movement are to transform research policy to place Art and Design at the center of STEM, encourage integration of Art and Design in K-20 education, and influence employers to hire artists and designers to drive innovation. By adding art and design to curricula, students can find creative solutions to STEM problems and develop critical thinking skills invaluable to their fields.

Pieces created should explore the areas of science, technology, engineering, and math through artistic design. Pieces can also speak to the integration of Art and Design into STEM and the transformation of our society and economy in the 21st century. Additional research about the STEM to STEAM movement is encouraged. All media will be accepted.

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A THOUSAND KINDS OF LIFE | ANTHROPOLOGY AND CULTURE
Intake: October 1 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: October 29 | Closing: November 19
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Anthropology is the study of humanity. Its main subdivisions are social and cultural anthropology, which describes the workings of societies around the world, linguistic anthropology, which investigates the influence of language in social life, and biological or physical anthropology, which concerns long-term development of the human organism.

As a defining aspect of what it means to be human, culture is a central concept in anthropology, encompassing the range of phenomena that are transmitted through social learning in human societies. The word is used in a general sense to refer to the ability to categorize and represent patterns of meaning with symbols and to act imaginatively and creatively. This capacity is often thought to be unique to humans, although some other species have demonstrated similar, though much less complex abilities for social learning. Culture is also used to denote the complex networks of practices and accumulated knowledge and ideas that are transmitted through social interaction and exist in specific human groups, or cultures, using the plural form.

Some aspects of human behavior such as language, social practices such as kinship, gender, and marriage, forms of expression such as art, music, dance, ritual, and religion, and technologies such as cooking, shelter, and clothing are said to be cultural universals, found in all human societies. The concept “material culture” covers the physical expressions of culture, such as technology, architecture, and art, whereas the immaterial aspects of culture that make up the intangible heritage of a culture include structures of social organization (including political organization and social institutions), mythology, philosophy, literature (both written and oral), and science.

Pieces created should be relevant to your own cultural background and anthropological history or can explore science, religion, and politics as statements about contemporary currents of American culture. All media will be accepted.

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FINE | MAKERS AND ARTISANS
Intake: November 5 | 10 am to 5 pm
Opening: December 3 | Closing: January, 2017
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The maker culture is a contemporary culture or subculture representing a technology-based extension of DIY culture that intersects with hacker culture which is less concerned with physical objects (opposed to software) and the creation of new devices (opposed to tinkering with existing ones). Typical interests enjoyed by the maker culture include engineering-oriented pursuits such as electronics, robotics, 3-D printing, and the use of CNC tools, as well as more traditional activities such as metalworking, woodworking, and, mainly, its predecessor, the traditional arts and crafts.

The community consists of a wide variety of interests and skill levels, from industry experts to garage tinkerers. For some it's a full-time job, while others are weekend warriors. The types of people who identify as makers are just as varied, from those who focus on home crafts, baking and preserving, to electronics experts, to woodworkers and welders.

An artisan (from French: artisan, Italian: artigiano) is a skilled craft worker who makes or creates things by hand that may be functional or strictly decorative, for example furniture, decorative arts, sculptures, clothing, jewelry, household items and tools or even mechanical mechanisms such as the handmade clockwork movement of a watchmaker.

Pieces created can be functional, decorative, or both and can encompass the current cultural climate of makers and makerspaces. Emphasis can be placed on metalworking, woodworking, and traditional arts and crafts such as textiles and fiber arts or a contemporary maker’s mindset of updated ideas on traditional materials into relevant themes and concepts. Additional research on maker culture and current trends in artisan craftsmanship are encouraged.

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PEOPLE'S CHOICE
December 3 - January, 2017
TBA